Northwest Coast News

CNBC interview with Pat Daniels: Enbridge Pipe Dreams?

CNBC VIdeo
 
Enbridge Pipe Dreams?

CNBC  Mad Money host  Jim Cramer377-cnbc2.jpg  interviews Enbridge’s Pat Daniels

Cramer: Enbridge is a Canadian company with a juicy 3.3% yield and a consistent track record of raising that payout. average of 11% over the last decade. They’ve given us a 15% boost this year. Enbridge is the kind ofconsistent dividend-raiser you can count on in good times and bad. they are so money!Why are you highlightinga pipeline company when oil has been getting slammed? the important thing is a company like enbridge is not hostage to oil. they’re related by long-term assets or regulated contracts.Enbridge has never once had to cut the dividend, not once. they’re more regular than metamucil…”

Daniels:  “The gateway pipeline project to the west coast would employ another 1,200 people on apermanent basis. and there would be about 63,000 man years of labor that would go into the construction of the pipeline. We call on crews from all across North America, capped, the U.S.and also from pipe suppliers right across North America. It has a huge positive impact on the economy and huge employment opportunities associated with both the construction and theoperation in our business.

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Energy sector needs to diversify its market

Calgary Herald


Energy sector needs to diversify its market

More on Enbridge Liquid Pipelines president Steve Wuori’s speech in Calgary:

Enbridge has proposed its Northern Gateway project between Edmonton and Kitimat — a $5.5 billion, two parallel pipeline project of 1,900 kilometres — which would diversify the market to include Asia and the Pacific Rim markets.

Wuori said the project would be a “game-changer” for Canada because of the unlocking of various new markets — leading to a $2-3 barrel increase in oil, a $270-billion increase in national GDP over 30 years, 63,000 person years of employment during construction, $4.3 billion in labour-related costs and income for people, and about 1,150 long-term jobs once Northern Gateway is in operation.

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Timeline: Alaska’s natural gas pipe dreams

Alaska Dispatch

Timeline: Alaska’s natural gas pipe dreams

Denali — The Alaska Gas Pipeline project is dead, which is déjà vu for many in Alaska. Talk of the gas line has been going on since workers struck oil at Prudhoe Bay in 1968. In 1977, President Jimmy Carter went so far as to sign legislation designating the Alaska Highway as the route the line would take. That’s pretty much been the trajectory of the project ever since….

In 2008, former Gov. Sarah Palin awarded the company the license to build the line, along with $500 million in state money to help it along the way. It was her signature piece of legislation. TransCanada says that its project is still moving forward.

But to know to know where Alaska’s going with this, it’s important to know where it’s been. 

374-denali-gas-pipeline-thumb-175x113-373.jpgAlaska Dispatch covers the plans, politics and problems of the Denali natural gas pipeline from 2003 until the cancellation of the project.

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Enbridge defends Northern Gateway pipeline

National Post

Enbridge defends Northern Gateway pipeline

Calgary-based Enbridge Inc. defended its controversial Northern
Gateway oil pipeline Wednesday as an important “game changer” for
Canada’s economy that has been wrongly portrayed in an alarmist,
inaccurate and unbalanced way.

In a Calgary speech, Stephen Wuori, president of Enbridge’s liquids
pipeline unit, urged the audience to help balance the discussion about
energy and energy development by taking critics to task on rumour,
misinformation and myth.

“When we read a newspaper story that gives credence and airtime to
unfounded anti-business, anti- development rhetoric, let’s call the
reporter, write a letter to the editor,” he said in his speech.

NEB hearings on KM LNG confirmed for Kitimat, June 7, 2011

Northwest Coast Energy News

By Robin Rowland

The National Energy Board has confirmed  on its website
that  the export licence hearings for the KM  LNG will go ahead in
Kitimat at the Riverlodge Community Centre on June 7, 2011, beginning at
9 a.m.

372-NEB.March6jpg.jpg
National Energy Board officials brief residents of Kitimat on the ground rules for the hearings on the KM LNG export licence, March 6, 2011. (Robin Rowland/Northwest Coast Energy News)

After an information meeting held  by NEB staff on March 6, 2011, there had been fears in the Kitimat community that since NEB policy calls for a hearing to be held where it is most convenient for stake holders and because the deadline for filing for intervenor status or information letters was just one week after the meeting, that the hearings might actually take place in Alberta.

Link to NEB documents  B01 – Application to export LNG for a period of 20 years (GH-1-2011)

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BP, ConocoPhillips Halt Proposed $35 Billion Alaska Gas-Pipeline Project: Bloomberg

Bloomberg

BP, ConocoPhillips Halt Proposed $35 Billion Alaska Gas-Pipeline Project

BP Plc  and ConocoPhillips dropped plans for a $35 billion Alaska natural-gas pipeline, once proposed to be the largest private construction project in U.S. history, because they didn’t get enough customer interest.

The companies will withdraw an application seeking federal approval to build a pipeline to bring gas from Alaska’s North Slope to U.S. and Canadian markets, according to a statement today…

Halting Denali leaves one competing pipeline proposal, backed by TransCanada Corp. (TRP) and Exxon Mobil Corp. (XOM), to bring 4.5 billion cubic feet of gas a day from Alaska’s North Slope… 

The two pipeline projects are not the only ways to sell North Slope gas, said Steve Rinehart, a spokesman for BP Alaska. Other options include liquefying the gas for transport to other markets by tanker, he said.

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Apache Executive: Kitimat LNG Export Terminal Project Under Way: Dow Jones

From Dow Jones via Automated Trader

Apache Executive: Kitimat LNG Export Terminal Project Under Way

The head of Apache Corp.’s (APA) Canadian business said Tuesday that work has begun on the company’s planned Kitimat liquefied natural gas export facility and that the first super-chilled natural gas could be shipped from there by late 2015.

Timothy Wall, Apache’s regional vice president for Canada, said during the Houston company’s annual investor meeting that he expects the project will receive gas export permits “by the end of the year.”

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Time to settle First Nations land claims: Financial Post

Diane Francis, columnist, Financial Post

Time to settle First Nations land claims

The time has come for Canada and the provinces to make timely and responsible resource development the country’s number one national interest. This represents a policy priority that has never existed but is absolutely essential today to protect Canadian living standards and rights.

To date, Canada has behaved like a patchwork quilt of special interests and various levels of government whose leaders have bobbed and weaved but never devised a just or swift means of settling, or rejecting, land claims by First Nations…..

This week, the opening shot of what could be a monumental battle was fired when First Nations representatives from British Columbia came to warn Big Oil in Calgary that they would obstruct any linkage to Asia via pipelines, and presumably, rail lines, through their territory. If joined by others, and this is a given, their obstructionism for gain, or ideology, will financially damage landlocked Alberta, the prairies, the North and therefore the living standards of all Canadians.

Frankly, I don’t blame First Nations for obstructing development because they face a politicized and dysfunctional court system that never settles, never seems to reject new claims, never deals with any expeditiously and never imposes a deadline on requests.

Editor’s note: Read the quote from Financial Post business columnist Diane Francis carefully. In the key paragraph quoted here, she mentions the economy of Alberta, the prairies and the North. Somehow she neglected to mention the economy of the British Columbia, and the impact of the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline, for good or ill on BC. A conservative columnist, Francis, seems to assume that First Nations are against the pipeline simply for gain or “ideology,” and that settling Land Claims will lead to the construction of the pipeline,

First Nations stand ground

Financial Post

First Nations stand ground

In case their unequivocal message hasn’t been received, British Columbia’s First Nations are in Calgary this week to make it clear to the board of directors of Enbridge Inc., Enbridge’s annual meeting of shareholders and members of the broader oil community that the proposed $5.5-billion Northern Gateway pipeline is not going forward. 

It will be a difficult message to accept. The pipeline between the oil sands in Alberta and Kitimat on the northern coast of B.C. is a big plank in the oil-and-gas industry’s strategy to develop a new market for its products in Asia, a major part of Enbridge’s growth strategy, a key piece of strategic infrastructure for all of Canada, and a major job creator for Western Canada.